India China Agreement 1954

Mr. CHANG HAN-FU, Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs, Central People`s Government, People`s Republic of China. April 29, 1954, 1988: Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi visits China. The two countries signed an agreement to establish a joint border working group and a joint group on economic relations, trade, science and technology. The five principles set out in the Sino-Indian Convention of 1954 are: I have received today, with gratitude, your letter of 14 October 1954, which is: (here is the text of letter 1) I agree with the content indicated in your letter above on behalf of the central government of the People`s Republic of China. Your letter and confirmation will be treated as part of the agreement. I have the honour of receiving your note of April 29, 1954, which is: On behalf of the Government of the Central People of the People of China, I herebly vote Write Your Excellency, and your note accompanied by this note in the answer will be an agreement between our two governments that enter into force. I would like to take this opportunity to express your excellence and consider that the Government of the Indian Republic ratified this agreement on 3 June 1954. I ask you to provide the central government of the People`s Republic of China with information on this ratification. I would like to take this opportunity to renew to you, Excellency, the assurances of my highest esteem. Now, in this article, tell us what the Panchsheel agreement between India and China was and why was it done? Bertil Lintner writes that in the agreement, “for the first time in history, Tibet has been called the “Tibetan region of China.” [2] The Panchsheel, or Five Principles of Peaceful Coexistence, was first officially signed on April 29, 1954 between India and the Tibet region of China. The agreement was signed between Jawaharlal Nehru, then Prime Minister, and the first Chinese Prime Minister, Chou En-Lai. The Panchsheel agreement was one of the most important relations between India and China to strengthen economic and security cooperation.

The underlying assumption of the Five Principles was that, after decolonization, newly independent states would be able to develop a new and more principled approach to international relations. [Citation required] I have the honour to inform you that the agreement between the People`s Republic of China and the Republic of India on trade and transport between China and India, signed on 29 April 1954 in Beijing by Chang Han-fu, Deputy Minister, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Central Government of the People`s Republic of China, for the Central Government of the People`s Republic of China and Nedyam Ragan. , Extraordinary and plenipotentiary ambassador of the Republic of India to the People`s Republic of China, for the Government of the Republic of India, was then ratified on 3 June 1954 by the Central People`s Government of the People`s Republic of China. I ask you to provide information to the Indian government about this ratification.

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